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FACSA | The Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse

is a non-profit organization working to:

Help enact laws that protect children from sex abuse;

Bring perpetrators of child sex abuse to justice;

Hold accountable societal structures that hide perpetrators

and fail to protect children from continued harm.

 

 

Donate to Help FACSA Stop Child Sex Abuse

Your donations will enable us to make justice, truth and accountabilty a reality for victims of child sex abuse by helping to change current laws that protect perps and their supervisors and fail to protect children.

To donate to FACSA:
By Check: Make check out to FACSA and mail to:

FACSA
740 Cornerstone Lane
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010

By Paypal (You can use a credit card) : 

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Check Out These Sites!

Find information related to PA and nationwide legislative efforts to abolish the statutes of limitation on child sex abuse

PA Rep. Mark Rozzi fights for sexual assault victims

Reform the Statues of Limitation on Child Sex Abuse

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By RICK COHEN | Non-Profit Quarterly | September 25, 2015

A very controversial part of the Pope's visit to the U.S. involved his statements about the Catholic Church's long-running clergy sex abuse scandal. Writing for the Washington Post, Abby Ohlheiser, Michelle Boorstein, and Terrence McCoy noted that Pope Francis said during a prayer session at St. Matthew's Cathedral in Washington that the clergy-perpetrated sexual abuse crimes should "never repeat themselves." But the three reporters also cited an array of comments ranging in tone from disappointed to outraged from a number of nonprofit organizations that have organized over the years to advocate for victims of Catholic clergy sexual abuse of children and adults.

In a statement that provoked much of the negative commentary, the Pope referenced the "courage" of the U.S. bishops assembled at St. Matthew's, praised their "self-criticism and at the cost of mortification and great sacrifice," and said, "I realize how much the pain of recent years has weighed upon you and I have supported your generous commitment to bring healing to victims – in the knowledge that in healing we, too, are healed – and to work to ensure that such crimes will never be repeated."

That didn't go over well with victims' advocates who believe that many of the bishops have done little to help the victims of sexual abuse at the hands of Catholic clergy and may have helped cover up the problem. The Post quoted John Salveson, the president of the Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse and a survivor of clergy sex abuse himself, who said, "To characterize the response of American Bishops to clergy abuse victims as 'generous' and 'courageous' is bizarre." Salveson added, "In reality, the American church hierarchy has treated clergy sex abuse victims as adversaries and enemies for decades...His concern about how the abuse crisis has weighed on the bishops' spirits, and his hope that all of their good deeds will help them heal from the crisis, reflects a profound misunderstanding of the role the church has played in this self-inflicted crisis."

Read more...
 

FACSA | Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse

To our supporters:

For the the survivors whose perpetrators were men or women in religious/spiritual roles:

These last few day may have been very hard for you. When I briefly watched the ceremonies here in Philadelphia and saw all the bishops and priests surround the Pope I remembered a conversation recently with a young lady who was dating someone. I asked her "Do you believe he respects you?". She said, "He tells me he cares about me and wants to be with me." I said "But how does he treat you? What does he do to show you he really cares and respects you?"

I felt that way the last few days when I have heard words that are, at best, well meaning, but for decades there has been a lack of meaningful actions by those religious leaders to back up their meaningful words.

We, here at FACSA, as articulated by our president, John Salveson, in a press statement below, would like to see much more actions by these leaders that would represent the mission and passion of their leader.

Marie Whitehead, Communications Coordinator

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 27, 2015

Contact: John Salveson at 215-870-0680 salveson@abolishsexabuse.org

Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse (FACSA) Statement Regarding Comments by Pope Francis on Clergy Sex Abuse

BRYN MAWR, PA – John Salveson, President of FACSA, (Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse) released the following statement regarding Pope Francis' comments in a speech to a group of bishops in Philadelphia today regarding the ongoing clergy sex abuse crisis in the Roman Catholic Church.

"This morning Pope Francis committed to 'careful oversight to ensure that youth are protected and that all responsible will be held accountable' when addressing the clergy sex abuse crisis.

The truth is that the survivor community has been asking the church to take several simple steps to protect children and hold perpetrators and enablers accountable for years, but the Church has refused to take these actions. If Pope Francis wishes to take effective action to back up his words he could take these steps immediately:

• Require that every diocese in the world immediately report all past and present allegations of clergy sex abuse to civil authorities when it is suspected or discovered. Today, only the Church in the United States of America has been given this direction.

• Require that every diocese in the world immediately disclose the identities of those who have been accused of child sex abuse so that children can be protected from them.

• Instruct the Vatican to immediately disclose the identities of the hundreds of priests who have been defrocked because of their sexual abuse of children so that children can be protected from them.

• Instruct every diocese and Catholic advocacy organization, such as the Catholic Conferences of every state in America, to immediately drop their relentless lobbying against the reform of criminal and civil statutes of limitations in place today, which protect abusers and enablers at the expense of children.

Most importantly, we implore the U.S. Department of Justice and the Attorneys General of each state in America to investigate the criminal behavior of the Roman Catholic Church in America and take the steps necessary to hold them accountable for their despicable actions."

 

 

LAURIE GOODSTEIN | NEW YORK TIMES | SEPT. 27, 2015

PHILADELPHIA — At the start of an otherwise joyous and well-received trip to the United States, Pope Francis infuriated some abuse victims when he praised American bishops for their handling of the sexual abuse scandal and told priests that he felt their pain.

On the last day of his journey, Francis stepped to a lectern here before hundreds of seminarians and bishops from around the world and tried to salve the open wound. He said he had met in private with a group of victims and pledged that "all responsible will be held accountable."

"God weeps" at the sexual abuse of children, he said in a translation from Spanish of his remarks added to the start of a scripted address in the chapel at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary here on Sunday. "I commit to the careful oversight to ensure that youth are protected."

His remarks and the meeting, anticipated for weeks and carefully choreographed, were greeted with varying degrees of skepticism by abuse victims who have now seen two popes on American trips meet with victims and make sweeping promises to protect children. They would like to believe that Francis' words are sincere and pledges are real, but they continue to have serious doubts, in part because of his comments last week, and because of how Sunday's gathering came together.

Read more...
 

"It is so completely out of touch with reality," says Main Line businessman and victims' advocate John Salveson.

BY VICTOR FIORILLO | PHILADELPHIA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

 SOL REFORM RALLY JSALVESON2

John Salveson speaks in the Capitol Rotunda in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania on September 21, 2015.

On Wednesday, Pope Francis addressed the United States bishops at the Cathedral of Saint Matthew the Apostle in Washington, D.C., and the subject of the clergy sex abuse scandal came up, though he steered clear of using the words "sexual abuse."

Pope Francis praised the bishops for their "courage" and "great sacrifice," and seemed to recognize the bishops themselves and the church as additional victims, saying, "I realize how much the pain of recent years has weighed upon you and I have supported your generous commitment to bring healing to victims – in the knowledge that in healing we, too, are healed – and to work to ensure that such crimes will never be repeated."

None of this sat very well with Bryn Mawr's John Salveson, who was sexually abused by a Catholic priest when he was a teenager. These days, Salveson is the co-founder of Radnor executive-search firm Salveson Stetson Group and president of the Foundation to Abolish Child Sexual Abuse. We got him on the phone for his reaction to Pope Francis' comments.

Were you surprised that Pope Francis addressed clergy sex abuse with the U.S. bishops in the way that he did?

I was very surprised by his comments. Really shocked. Now, I'm a bit of an outlier on this, but I'm not one of those people holding their breath for the pope to do something to make everything better. The object is not to get the Catholic church to be good to people again, to take care of victims, or to do the right thing.

So what is the object?

A lot of the behavior is criminal behavior, but the statute of limitations is so small, so they rarely get dragged off to jail. Monsignor Lynn was the first person arrested and convicted in the entire hierarchy, which is just unbelievable.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 23, 2015

Contact: John Salveson at 215-870-0680 salveson@abolishsexabuse.org

Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse (FACSA) Statement Regarding Comments by Pope Francis on Clergy Sex Abuse

BRYN MAWR, PA – John Salveson, President of FACSA, (Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse) released the following statement regarding Pope Francis' comments in a speech to 300 bishops in Washington regarding their treatment of clergy sex abuse victims in America.

"The Pope's comments to U.S. bishops this afternoon were both insulting and hurtful to survivors of clergy abuse. To characterize the response of American Bishop's to clergy abuse victims as 'generous' and 'courageous' is bizarre. In reality, the Roman Catholic Church in America has treated clergy sex abuse victims as adversaries and enemies for decades.

In addition, his concern about how the abuse crisis has weighed on the bishop's spirits, and his hope that all of their good deeds will help them heal from the crisis reflects a profound misunderstanding of the role the church has played in this self-inflicted crisis."

 

 

Interview with Rep. Rozzi The Takeaway with John Hockenberry

Tens of thousands will try to catch a glimpse of Pope Francis in Washington, D.C. today, as he parades through the nation's capitol.

But for some Catholics, the pope's visit is just a symbol of unfinished business in the church.

According to one estimate, as many as 100,000 American children have been victims of sexual abuse at the hands of Catholic clergy. Pope Francis has gone farther than his predecessors in addressing the problem: He's created a Vatican tribunal to try bishops accused of covering up abuse, and called a 17-member commission on abuse.

Still, plenty of victims want to see the Church go further in addressing the problem, victims like Representative Mark Rozzi, a Pennsylvania state legislator.

Rep. Rozzi grew up in Temple, Pennsylvania in a deeply Catholic community. His entire extended family went to the same parochial school, where Rozzi was abused by a priest at the age of 13.

Rep. Rozzi tells The Takeaway that, for him, the pope's visit brings only traumatic memories.

 

Recent news interview with FACSA president, John Salveson

 

Rozzi joined by advocates, stakeholders to modernize child sex abuse statutes of limitations

Rep. Mark Rozzi, Rep. Louise Williams Bishop September 21, 2015 | 4:51 PM

 

HARRISBURG, Sept. 21 — State Rep. Mark Rozzi, D-Berks, held a Capitol news conference today to highlight the drastic need for reform of Pennsylvania's archaic laws affecting victims of child sexual abuse.

Rozzi was accompanied by state Sen. Rob Teplitz, D-Dauphin/Perry; Rep. Louise Williams Bishop, D-Phila.; Rep. Tom Murt, R-Montgomery/Phila.; and prominent reform advocates to discuss their respective bills, which are largely modeled after previously introduced legislation that would modify the statute of limitations to allow victims to seek civil action against perpetrators.

Rozzi's House Bill 661 and Teplitz's Senate Bill 582, which is an identical Senate companion bill, would raise the age for an adult victim of child sex abuse to file a civil claim from 30 to 50 and permit previously time-barred victims to bring suit.

"Five million dollars has been allocated in our state budget to ensure the Pope's safety this week in Philadelphia," Rozzi said. "Hours were spent in last month's 'mock' House session decrying how we don't care about funding for rape victims and yet not one finger has been lifted in the past ten years by our leaders to enact laws which will actually stop the culture of abuse in this commonwealth."

"There's no expiration date on the pain survivors endure, there should be no expiration date on when they seek justice," Teplitz said. "Our legislation is a fair and reasonable reform measure that needs to be considered now."

Bishop's House Bill 655 would eliminate the statute of limitation for criminal and civil cases prospectively to allow for victims of child sexual abuse to file charges regardless of the amount of time that's passed since the alleged abuse occurred.

"As a child, you've just be raped by someone you respected and loved. You can't believe what happened...You're stunned and ashamed. Will they hurt someone else if you tell? Will this cause more heartache and trouble in your family? Who will believe you? The trauma becomes a secret between you and your demon. I kept my secret for more than 60 years,"  said Rep. Bishop

Murt's House Bill 951 would create a two-year window for past victims of child sex abuse to file civil suit.

"People who were abused as children are a unique class of victims. Crimes against them are deliberately cultivated and hidden by the so-called 'pillars' of the community. We must allow survivors to exercise their rights to seek justice. We need to open the window," said Rep. Murt.

SOLReformRally092115 1

Also in attendance at the news conference to show their support for reforming the state's statute of limitation reforms were Lynne Abraham, former Philadelphia district attorney; Jennifer Storm, victim advocate for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Jeff Dion, director of the National Crime Victim Bar Association and the National Center for Victims of Crime; Bruce Castor Jr., Montgomery County commissioner, former president of the Pennsylvania District Attorneys' Association; John Salveson, president of the Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse; Jeffrey Fritz, former president of the National Crime Victim Bar Association; and Linda Crocket, program developer for the Samaritan Counseling Center and SafeChurch.

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BY KEVIN MCCORRY, NEWSWORKS

SEPTEMBER 22, 2015

Listen to interview HERE

ArthurBaseliceArthur Baselice Jr.'s grief has pushed him into a self-imposed exile.

Almost 10 years after his son died from a drug overdose with links to his abuse by two Franciscan clergymen in Northeast Philadelphia, Baselice rarely leaves his house.

"I don't want to go nowhere," said Baselice.

Walking through the Baselice home in suburban South Jersey is like walking through a monument to their lost son, Arthur Baselice III. Pictures of him are everywhere. The urn with his ashes sits on a table at the entrance to the living room, where each night his father and mother light a candle in his honor.

Arthur's bedroom, covered in sports memorabilia, is exactly the way he left it on the night that he died.

"Nothing's changed," said the father. "Same sheet, same bedspread. Everything is the same."

Baselice Jr., 67, a retired Philadelphia detective who grew up a Catholic school kid in South Philadelphia, has a tattoo of his son's face on his left forearm. Some of his son's ashes rest in a bracelet on his right wrist.

All these years later, the pain hasn't dulled. Baselice often wakes up in the middle of the night gasping for breath, tormented by what happened. Sometimes, as he jogs through his Gloucester County neighborhood – seemingly out of nowhere – he bursts into tears.

His wife, Elaine, and his daughter, Ashleigh, he says, are no better.

"Do I cry a lot?" said Baselice. "Yeah, most of the time."

Baselice says he didn't used to be an emotional person.

"Emotional?" he scoffs with the jaded laugh of a policeman. "Not at all. But this hit home."

'Makes me sick'

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